Fundraising for Mind – breast pump donation

In February, we successfully crowdfunded over £500 which we split between two charities (Mind and Medicines Sans Frontiers) and the sling library. Well the lovely people at Nuby have once again been exceedingly generous and given us their last remaining stock following redesign and launch of a new pump. That is 40 brand new breast pumps available for new homes for well.,..what ever you think they are worth. We are going to keep some spares here but will have at least 30 to send to new families in return for your donation.

As many of you are aware I have set myself a summer of running and your money will go to the sling library chosen charity – Mind UK. This charity is close to my heart and I have seen first hand the work they do. So far this year, I have already completed RED January, the Sunderland Half and Blaydon Race. In 2 weeks, it is the Great North 10k and 4 weeks today, the Durham City 10k before GNR in September.

Key features of the pump

  • Dual action Electric breast pump set. Product supplied with UK plug and English instructions only.
  • Adapter to allow for use as a manual pump
  • Memorizes personalized rhythm, fast rhythm to encourage milk flow; slow to express gently
  • Flex Neck silicone Horn and hygienic cover
  • Breast pump standing cradle
  • Includes 150ml bottle , a silicone storage lid, 6 disposable breast pads, Breastpump standing cradle.

How to get yours!

1) Make a donation via our JustGiving page. Please ensure you put your name and that it is for a pump.

2) Send is a message via email to rachel@northeastslinglibrary.co.uk to arrange collection.

3) If you can’t collect, we can post but ask that you cover postage and pay this via BACS or friends PayPal. It’s £3.95 for 2nd signed for delivery.

Voila!!

How much can we raise this time? Let’s smash my target and help Mind to help even more families. Mental Health doesn’t just affect one person but the whole family. 1 in 4 people will suffer from mental health issues in their lifetime. Let’s help fight it.

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Nuby Breast Pump donation

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Yesterday, I went to the HQ of Nuby UK to collect 49 brand new Nuby Natural Touch Rhythm Breast Pumps. These have been donated to the sling library and we are able to decide what to do with them. NESL are pro-choice in terms of how mothers feed their babies, so were delighted to by Nuby’s offer. Nuby have recently redesigned and are launching  a new pump and did not want these to go to waste. Their focus is on providing  mothers with choice and providing an affordable breast pump.

The pumps are brand new and in their boxes and retail at between £68-85.

Key features:

  • Dual action Electric breast pump set. Product supplied with UK plug and English instructions only.
  • Adapter to allow for use as a manual pump
  • Memorizes personalized rhythm, fast rhythm to encourage milk flow; slow to express gently
  • Flex Neck silicone Horn and hygienic cover
  • Breast pump standing cradle
  • Includes 150ml bottle , a silicone storage lid, 6 disposable breast pads, Breastpump standing cradle

breast pump

We would like these pumps to go to families who may not be able to afford a new pump, have babies who are unwell or who would simply benefit from them. A small number are also being donated to another sling library and other causes.

How can I get one?

Well, as many of you know I started running last year. In March I am running 10 miles, and then in May I am completing the Sunderland 1/2 marathon before the Blaydon Race in June and the Great North Run in September. As a novice runner, I am both excited and slightly dreading these in equal measure. A pump can be yours for a small donation of whatever you can afford. These will be I intend to continue to fundraise for Medicine Sans Frontier, Mind and the sling library itself. As a minimum I am hoping to raise £400 but I am sure we could raise more.

There are several ways to donate.

  1. In person at the Saturday Sling Library sessions – collect your pump and donate.
  2. Via our Just Giving crowdfunding page.

Once donations are received, get in touch and we can arrange collection of the pump. I will split the donations once received and send to the two charities. I will update the fundraising page with how many pumps are left, when we reach/exceed our target and when fundraising is closed.

 

Safe sling use and the pressure to feed in a sling

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The arrival of a new baby is a joyous occasion and the desire to want to keep them safe is one that is at the forefront of a mothers mind. As mothers we do all we can from the minute we discover we are expecting (and before in some cases) to protect them. Keeping baby close to you can be one of the easiest way of helping mums know that baby is safe and this is why many parents will choose to use a sling with their baby.  Babies want and need to be held; they are biologically programmed to want to be close to their care giver.

Sadly though, there are risks when carrying a baby and it is crucial that we follow some simple safety guidelines. Special consideration should be a taken when carrying babies who were born prematurely, with a low birth weight or who have underlying medical conditions; however, it is also important to remember that carrying can be extremely beneficial to both baby and mother in these situations. Kangaroo Mother Care has been proven to have health benefits and to save lives and reduced length of hospital stay, and using a carrier can help attachment and bonding (especially important if mothers are suffering from PND). We must therefore acknowledge the risks of using a sling are outweighed by the benefits.

Changes in the carrying industry following the Infantino Slingrider recall in 2010 have looked to address many of the issues of carrying young babies and the increase in easily accessible trained babywearing support has become a much larger element of the carrying community. There has been an increase in regulation (primarily in USA) and  professionalism within the industry, with sling libraries and babywearing consultants now available across the country. As carrying has moved from a small niche audience to mainstream parenting, it is no longer unusual to see carriers on sale on the high street or to see parents using slings with their babies, toddlers and even preschoolers. Carrying our young is biologically normal. It allows us to meet the needs of baby while carrying on with our lives; whether this is looking after other children or simply getting out of the house.

47432285 - a mother breast feeding his baby at home
Copyright: lopolo / 123RF Stock Photo

It is this societal expectation to ‘get back to normal’ that leads many parents to want to do several things at once. One of the most frequently asked questions I am asked or read is: “Can I feed in it?” For many mothers, breastfeeding can be something they fear doing in public and want something to help them cover up, or to let them ‘feed on the go’. As a mother I understand this completely. As a breastfeeding peer supporter I understand the fears women have. As a society, we traditionally hold babies in arms in a cradle position (the need to support their head is drilled into us from when we are children) and this position is often associated with breastfeeding or seen as the main feeding position. Unfortunately, this position in a sling is dangerous if not done correctly. In arms a baby is supported and his parents are fully aware of what baby is doing. However, in a carrier their disproportionately large heads and weak neck muscles, combined with the weight of gravity and the bounce of fabric (as well as a feeling you are hands free) can cause babies chins to rest upon their chest. This has the potential to block their airway and sadly lead to positional asphyxia (similar effects can be caused by infant car seats).

8094358 - walk with the child in a baby sling. breastfeeding

Copyright: lenor / 123RF Stock Photo

As a carrying consultant, I often tell mums that “if you need my help to feed in a sling, you aren’t good enough at one or the other”. I don’t mean this in a way to criticise the mother (although I know many might see it like that). Breastfeeding and using a sling are skills that need to be learned and trying to mix them can lead to frustration and a feeling of failure. As babies get older and feeding is better established combining the two is a natural link to make, but in the early days when baby and you are learning what to do, please do not feel you have to try, it is ok to sit and rest, to watch the feed carefully, to learn the signs of when your baby is full.

Copyright: North East Sling Library

13032095 - mother with baby in a slingIt is the risk of positional asphyxia when using a cradle carry position (typically in a ring sling or stretchy wrap carrier) that has led to it being removed from many manufacturer’s instructions, why I have only taught it twice (both in situations where upright and off-centred positions were not possible due to other medical complications and neither wanted to feed in the sling) and why a post on social media asking how to do it can lead to many having a meltdown at their keyboards. Unfortunately, there are slings that still have it in their instructions or which advertise breastfeeding position as a selling feature (often cheaper brands sold on ebay/amazon) and there are thousands of videos on YouTube– a quick search of the site brought up 2100 hits (over 3000 if you use the search term breastfeeding in a stretchy sling) – of various levels of detail clarity.

Copyright: lenor / 123RF Stock Photo

Therefore, when carrying a baby in a carrier it is important to take time to learn how to use your sling; to read the instructions (I know as parents life is busy but it is worth it), to practice tying it and to seek help/support if necessary.  When looking at buying a sling (a term I use for all carriers except framed back carriers but which is often most used for stretchy wrap carriers) ask yourself some simple questions:

  • Is it from a respected company?
  • Do they have up to date instructions and safety guidelines on their website?
  • Can you get in touch with them for support?
  • Has it been safety tested and is it made with child safe dyes?
  • Is the price too good to be true?

When using your carrier it is important to follow the TICKS guidelines. These were developed in March 2010 and have become the gold standard for safe baby carrying in the UK (North America often use the Visible and Kissable rule). TICKS seeks to provide 5 simple and easy to remember steps to keep baby safe by maintaining a clear airway: Tight, in view, close enough to kiss, keep chin off chest and supported back. One of the simplest ways of achieving these five steps are to keep baby in an upright position and babies can be carried upright from birth; a well-fitting sling will provide a newborn with the support they need for their head (being held upright also has the benefit of  helping babies with wind). But, being upright, can make it harder to breastfeed in a sling to begin with, although as baby gets older it gets easier – this biological upright feeding position can be easier for baby too.  Keeping baby visible allows us to easily monitor them, to make changes if necessary. Tying the carrier tight and ensuring it fully supports babies back not only helps them to feel secure (by creating a point of stability), it prevents them from being able to slump in the carrier.

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Carrying your baby in a sling is a wonderful feeling and can be extremely empowering to the mother (and other caregivers). Done safely, it can be the key in unlocking amazing adventures together or simply getting out of the house. Enjoy the freedom, the cuddles and take one step at a time. Do not think, that by putting baby in the sling they are fine by themselves, babies needs change with seconds. It should be an enjoyable shared experience but one where the wearer is fully aware of babies needs at all times. If in doubt, stop and ask for our help: that is why I and consultants across the country are here.

 


Where to find out more

http://www.cochrane.org/CD002771/NEONATAL_kangaroo-mother-care-reduce-morbidity-and-mortality-low-birthweight-infants

http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/42587/1/9241590351.pdf

https://sheffieldslingsurgery.wordpress.com/2014/04/04/sling-safety-with-young-babies/

https://www.nct.org.uk/parenting/sling-safety

http://babyslingsafety.co.uk/

http://www.which.co.uk/reviews/baby-carriers-and-baby-slings/article/baby-carrier-and-baby-sling-safety/baby-carrier-and-baby-sling-safety-tips