Slinging New Year’s Resolutions

Hands up? Have you made a New Year’s Resolution?  Was it financial, health, educational or technological related? As these are often in lists of the most popular. Or have you made a slinging resolution? 

Many of us will have set ourselves targets for 2017. In the USA approx. 45% of individuals will have made a New Year’s Resolution. This figure in UK is around 32-35%. But roughly only 50% manage to stick to them for the 6 months (8% the year), although around 3/4 of us manage to stick to them for at least a week.

In terms of your New Years Resolution – have you written it down? Told someone what it is? How are you going to ensure you keep it? Sharing them with others apparently can help us to stick to them.

I have set myself the target of selling my personal collection of ring slings as our carrying days are over. So far I have asked Isaac to pick one to keep –  as I want to keep one each for the boys (Silver Waves for Henry, our Dyed Roses Zen for Isaac) – but at the minute this is as far as I have got.  The bag of slings is sitting there looking at me. I want to be successful and have told the sling library users this is my resolution and I am hoping this will assist me in keeping it. My bank balance would certainly appreciate me selling some slings.

So I asked the users of the sling library what their Slinging New Years Resolutions are.  Some like me want to sell our slings as our babies are no longer babies, others want to learn a new skill (e.g learning to wrap or improving their wrapping skills), and others want to try and ‘sling it only’. I have read at least two comments for mums saying the want to “stop buying slings”, and the opposite is true for a couple too. 

Julie’s slinging resolution:

Mine is to give a serious go to using a single pram and a sling for my 19mo and her baby sibling due to arrive next month. I don’t really understand why, but I desperately don’t want a double pram!

In a similar light, Charlotte would like to: “Go out proper hiking with sling, need to work out logistics! Like how to carry the rest of the stuff!”

My favourite are from Madeleine and Lucie (both peer supporters) who want to help enable more people to carry. Babywearing is a lovely sharing community and this is seen by the way people want to help others.

I suppose our slinging resolutions fit pretty well with general New Year’s Resolutions too: spend less/save more, personal development/mastering a new skill and even decluttering. I am here for 1:1 appointments if you want to develop your skills – learn to wrap or master a back carry. Just visit the  consultancy pages of our website to make your booking. 

I can’t though promise to help you destash but maybe if we do it together we might just be successful.


Links and photos 

http://www.statisticbrain.com/new-years-resolution-statistics/

http://www.comresglobal.com/polls/bupa-new-year-resolution-survey/

https://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2015/dec/31/how-long-do-people-keep-their-new-year-resolutions

Stock photos used free of charge from Pixabay under common use licence. The photos of me are mine and copyright belongs to me.

What the flip? Part Two: How to create a close shoulder flip.

In my recent What the flip? article I discussed the reasons why shoulder flips can be useful when using a number of different slings. It considered the reasons for and against closed and open shoulder flips. In this piece I am going to look at two different methods of achieving a closed shoulder flip. A closed shoulder flip is a secure flip. It helps create a clear space around baby, can make a sling more comfortable by spreading weight over a wider area, help support knee by creating a vertical line and supporting the back with a horizontal line. Learning how to achieve them is a skill that can add an extra set of tools to a sling users toolkit.

There are two methods to achieving a closed shoulder flip. There is a large level of personal preference in which method will choose to use. Neither is the right way. It is up to you. The first involves allowing the fabric to fall from your shoulder before lifting the bottom rail up to your neck. The second requires you to guide the top rail underneath the sling until it has taken the place of the bottom rail. Both work equally well, both are secure closed flips.

 Method 1 – fall and fold.

Decide which carry you wish to do and why you need to achieve a shoulder flip. I am doing a front double hammock. I have switched which wrap I use for teaching purposes during the slide show.

In this method you allow the wrap to fall gently from your shoulder slightly, creating enough space for you to fold the bottom rail up so that it is closest to your neck, creating the vertical line to support the babies knee. When you have completed this, gently gather the slack on your shoulder so you are left with a small capped sleeve, rather than the full width of wrap down your arm.

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 Method 2 – up and under.

Here you can see the method  of reaching underneath and working top rail out. Choose which carry you are wishing to create. I was opting for a Front Double Hammock here. Supporting babies weight with one hand reach up and underneath the fabric to grab the top rail. With this wrap this is the pink stripe. Gentle work this underneath the fabric until it is out in the place of the bottom rail. As you can see here the purple bottom rail is now closest to my neck and the pink stripe is now on outside furthest away from me. This pink top rail is helping to support babies back and provide tension to the carry. The purple stripe is creating a vertical line from babies knee and helping to support this it.

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Once achieved closed shoulder flips are extremely comfortable and secure. Why not have a go too? Why do you like a shoulder flip? Do you opt for open or closed?

 

 

  

Carrying and its role in Toby and Teddy’s lives

The next in our blog series on carrying children with additional needs is written by Rachel. She is a mum of two boys and lives in the North East. Her eldest son was diagnosed with Autism just after his second birthday. Autism is a spectrum disorder and those with the condition can vary in severity. Autistic Spectrum Disorders are a “condition that affects social interaction, communication, interests and behaviour”.  Difficulties in communication and social interaction can have a massive impact on families. Carrying Toby, and his younger brother Teddy, has allowed Rachel and her husband to adjust. I will let Rachel take over now. Continue reading

The Tired Mummy Chicken Pox Survival Kit

img_1877Isaac has Chicken Pox! It has been 3 years since the pox last hit our house. Henry had it in the summer so we basically lived in the garden for a week. Unfortunately, it is a tad too chilly in February to be spending our days in the garden. The pox has been at nursery for a few weeks but up to now Isaac had avoided it but not anymore! I got the phone all from nursery yesterday afternoon to say could I collect him. This morning it is very clear that it is Chicken Pox.

Henry took chicken pox in his stride. He was happy as long as he wore a long sleeved cricket top and a fleece jumper.

Isaac on the other hand is Isaac. Nothing is ever plain sailing. A 15 minute battle to put camomile lotion on is testament to that. I have a feeling it is going to be a very long day, especially as Henry and Daddy are off to watch the new Star Wars movie after school. Typically the pox has arrived when Martin and I had plans for the weekend – tickets for the Calcutta Cup (Scotland v England) in the Six Nations Rugby.

So here is my survival kit and how I intend to cope over the next few days: plenty of tea, antihistamine, infant paracetamol, calamine cream, slings (my Opitai and preschool Connecta Baby Carrier Solar), suck pads for the straps of the carriers, my Boba Hoodie and copious amounts of chocolate, oh and the TV/iPad.


The antihistamine, calamine cream and the infant paracetamol are to help treat the Isaac’s symptoms. The antihistamine and calamine cream to stop the itching, and the paracetamol to treat his temperature. The slings allow me to care for his needs and want to be held. When children are poorly they want and need comfort. The Opitai is a custom size wrap conversion and the Connecta is made from the lightweight Solar fabric. Both are soft and non-irritating on his already “scratchy mummy” skin. The Boba Hoodie allows us to walk the dog and get some fresh air (yes I am as tired as I look) while both staying warm. He is refusing to get dressed in anything other than the fleece pyjamas he got for Christmas. The chocolate and tea are for me (although he has already spied the chocolate). The iPad and TV are keeping him entertained and helping him to forgot that he wants to scratch. The car will probably be coming into use too so that I can get him to sleep (he is pretending in the photo of Boba Hoodie).

 

What is your top tip for coping with Chicken Pox? I’d love him to have an oat bath but so far the idea of him going in bath or shower is apparently abhorrent.

Gideon’s Story

This piece is the third installment of our series looking at how babywearing and carrying is more than just being about the sling and how it can help families who have babies and children with additional needs. It is written by Rae, a Mum of Three. I have ‘known’ Rae for the majority of my own carrying journey as we are both members of the Natural Mamas forum and we shared our own pregnancy journey’s on its pregnancy sub forum. Here Rae will explain how using a sling helped her care for and bond with her third son. When Gideon was born he was diagnosed with Prader-Willi Syndrome or (PWS). 

At birth babies with PWS are usually very floppy (hypotonia) and this means they often cannot suck properly, have a weak cry and often do not have a full range of movement. It is a genetic disorder that is typically not diagnosed until baby has been born, although lack of movement in utero can be associated with the condition. There have been research studies undertaken to investigate if fetal ultrasound scanning can be used to help diagnose the condition but currently 99% of cases are diagnosed via genetic testing.

Continue reading